Mac [Air, Pros] vs. being free

What:

  • 10 x Mac Pro, Early 2009, 2.66 GHz Quad-Core Xeon, 32 GB, Radeon HD 4870

Preliminary:

All SD cards are formatted with “Disk Utility” on the Mac OS, using GPT partitions. Make one partition, use the FAT filesystem, and apply. This actually creates two partitions, a small (200MB) EFI partition (say  /dev/sdb1) and the requested FAT partition (say /dev/sdb2).

To enter the EFI boot menu on Macintosh hardware, hold down the option key at boot.

The generated SD card may work as-is on newer Mac Pro models when connected to the machine via a USB SD card reader inserted into the front panel USB interface on the machine. However, to boot Mac Airs, one must put the generated SD card into the SD card slot, not via USB.

OS:

  • Use unetbootin to create a 14.04 Netinstall x86_64 boot disk on any SD flash card >= 8GB. Insert it in the SD slot on a macbook Air, plug in another mSD/SD card via USB and install onto it. Both netinstall and the mac version of the live cd have some issues with putting GRUB on the MBR. On what partition should GRUB be installed such that the SD card that is used for the installation can actually be booted? Open question….
  • Use the updated Fedora 20 livecd from the respins to make a bootable live SD disk. Use the –efi command to make it bootable on EFI systems. Like so:

    livecd-iso-to-disk --efi --format --extra-kernel-args selinux=0 ~bkoz/mounts/software/fedora/20/Fedora-Live-Desktop-x86_64-20-1.iso  /dev/sdb
    

    How to disable Plymouth

    plymouth.enable=0
    

    How to use systemd See in particular how to boot into a rescue shell, similar to ye-old-style “init 1”

    systemd.unit=rescue.target
    

    And how to boot into “init 3”

    systemd.unit=multi-user.target
    

    And how to boot into “init 5”

    systemd.unit=graphical.target
    

    How to make nomodeset permanent.

Will need to install Broadcom wireless drivers:

yum install -y broadcom-wl

Dream Freely

 

 

This is a picture of the moon.

Please humor me for ten seconds, and be silent. Look at the moon and think about the art that we will make in the future. Ten seconds.

(one thousand)

(two thousand)

(three thousand)

(four thousand)

(five thousand)

(six thousand)

(seven thousand)

(eight thousand)

(nine thousand)

(ten thousand)

Ten.

Fifty.

This year is the fiftieth anniversary of the free speech movement. That’s both a historical event that has special significance for Berkeley, Palo Alto, San Francisco, and the wider Bay Area. And it’s something that set up a chain of events that gave citizens of the US special privileges with respect to media and rights in the public sphere.

Related to the free speech movement is free software. This is the idea that every human being should be able to interact with computers without any shackles of commercial control. Free software can be thought of as a social movement that started when one guy wanted to print, and couldn’t use the printer software. Part of my art practice is being a free software diplomat.

Related to free software is free culture. Culture is what we make as artists. Freedom of expression is important, and a vital tool in making art.

This fall, in honor of the free speech movement, I’m dedicating myself to free culture. As part of this I’m looking for allies, artists, and accomplices. My first project is to turn any unused computers in the Graduate Computer lab into a free-software based rendering grid during the weekend midnight hours. I’ll keep this to un-used workstations on the weekends, between the hours of midnight to 7am, and choose to think of it as these machines dreaming freely.

Notes on the software/hardware configuration.

iAM/iCAN CJ Redux

sky.(selectionS+).32

iAM/iCAN is a multimedia documentary shot in Austin, Texas in 1994. It featured tagged/searchable video embedded into a raster graphic interface. Five subjects discussed gender, race, nascent-on-line culture, technology, hopes and dreams for the future. Given the technical constraints of the time, this meant 4:3 aspect video compressed to a rather severe 160 x 160 pixels, so that streaming off of a state-of-the-art 2x cd-rom player was feasible. Video was shot by Shane Herman, and edited with Premiere. An interface was coded in Director. We called it New Media but didn’t really even understand the Old Medias.

background(james)

Years later, the video is small and grainy and the interface elements seem rather small, but still pretty. The audio is still quite powerful. The interface doesn’t work anymore but the individual graphic elements can be clicked on and the original files are still valid. Still holding interest: the audio, the actual interviews.

Here are all the interviews with CJ Manetta-Romano, who has fearlessly given permission to share his commentary from 1994.


Politics, Working Together, Unity


Interactive Entertainment, Technology as Adult Toys


Internet Culture


Was Intimidated by Technology


Future Interactive Education


Gender Generation Gap


Gender Stereotypes and Rave Flyers


Anarchy, Raves as Free Space


Future Raves, After Raves

iAM/iCAN Steve Redux

sky.(selectionS+).32

iAM/iCAN is a multimedia documentary shot in Austin, Texas in 1994. It featured tagged/searchable video embedded into a raster graphic interface. Five subjects discussed gender, race, nascent-on-line culture, technology, hopes and dreams for the future. Given the technical constraints of the time, this meant 4:3 aspect video compressed to a rather severe 160 x 160 pixels, so that streaming off of a state-of-the-art 2x cd-rom player was feasible. Video was shot by Shane Herman, and edited with Premiere. An interface was coded in Director. We called it New Media but didn’t really even understand the Old Medias.

background(james)

Years later, the video is small and grainy and the interface elements seem rather small, but still pretty. The audio is still quite powerful. The interface doesn’t work anymore but the individual graphic elements can be clicked on and the original files are still valid. Still holding interest: the audio, the actual interviews.

Here are all the interviews with Steve Wechsler, who has fearlessly given permission to share his commentary from 1994.


Components of Activism


Empathy Leads to Unity


Future Vision


Entertainment Is Passive


Commodity Culture


Anonymity of Cyberspace Manifests in Rave


Lossy Communication


Internet Culture, Email Lists, Online Education

iAM/iCAN Brandon Redux

sky.(selectionS+).32

iAM/iCAN is a multimedia documentary shot in Austin, Texas in 1994. It featured tagged/searchable video embedded into a raster graphic interface. Five subjects discussed gender, race, nascent-on-line culture, technology, hopes and dreams for the future. Given the technical constraints of the time, this meant 4:3 aspect video compressed to a rather severe 160 x 160 pixels, so that streaming off of a state-of-the-art 2x cd-rom player was feasible. Video was shot by Shane Herman, and edited with Premiere. An interface was coded in Director. We called it New Media but didn’t really even understand the Old Medias.

background(brandon)

Years later, the video is small and grainy and the interface elements seem rather small, but still pretty. The audio is still quite powerful. The interface doesn’t work anymore but the individual graphic elements can be clicked on and the original files are still valid. Still holding interest: the audio, the actual interviews.

Here are all the interviews with Brandon Rogeness, who has fearlessly given permission to share his commentary from 1994.


Government and Politics


Generation Mine


Multicultural Background, Black and Latin Histories


Minority and Majority Rights


Conflict Resolution


Aggression and Violence


Hacking, Chaos


Limitations of CD-ROM medium


My Computer Interface


Computer Use and Abuse


Kids and Cats

iAM/iCAN James Redux

sky.(selectionS+).32

iAM/iCAN is a multimedia documentary shot in Austin, Texas in 1994. It featured tagged/searchable video embedded into a raster graphic interface. Five subjects discussed gender, race, nascent-on-line culture, technology, hopes and dreams for the future. Given the technical constraints of the time, this meant 4:3 aspect video compressed to a rather severe 160 x 160 pixels, so that streaming off of a state-of-the-art 2x cd-rom player was feasible. Video was shot by Shane Herman, and edited with Premiere. An interface was coded in Director. We called it New Media but didn’t really even understand the Old Medias.

background(james)

Years later, the video is small and grainy and the interface elements seem rather small, but still pretty. The audio is still quite powerful. The interface doesn’t work anymore but the individual graphic elements can be clicked on and the original files are still valid. Still holding interest: the audio, the actual interviews.

Here are all the interviews with James Edward Neal, who has fearlessly given permission to share his commentary from 1994.


Conflict Resolution


Minorities in the System


Political Activity


Hopes for Internet


Prejudice Online


Multicultural Background


Multicultural Education


Extended Families


My Own Computer


Kids


Thanks

CCC 2013

Links to talks from the CCC Congress 2013, from CCC-TV.

Have Fun!