Dream Freely

 

 

This is a picture of the moon.

Please humor me for ten seconds, and be silent. Look at the moon and think about the art that we will make in the future. Ten seconds.

(one thousand)

(two thousand)

(three thousand)

(four thousand)

(five thousand)

(six thousand)

(seven thousand)

(eight thousand)

(nine thousand)

(ten thousand)

Ten.

Fifty.

This year is the fiftieth anniversary of the free speech movement. That’s both a historical event that has special significance for Berkeley, Palo Alto, San Francisco, and the wider Bay Area. And it’s something that set up a chain of events that gave citizens of the US special privileges with respect to media and rights in the public sphere.

Related to the free speech movement is free software. This is the idea that every human being should be able to interact with computers without any shackles of commercial control. Free software can be thought of as a social movement that started when one guy wanted to print, and couldn’t use the printer software. Part of my art practice is being a free software diplomat.

Related to free software is free culture. Culture is what we make as artists. Freedom of expression is important, and a vital tool in making art.

This fall, in honor of the free speech movement, I’m dedicating myself to free culture. As part of this I’m looking for allies, artists, and accomplices. My first project is to turn any unused computers in the Graduate Computer lab into a free-software based rendering grid during the weekend midnight hours. I’ll keep this to un-used workstations on the weekends, between the hours of midnight to 7am, and choose to think of it as these machines dreaming freely.

Notes on the software/hardware configuration.